Trough - planted with American rock plants

 Trough - planted with American rock plants    copyright  2002 Mark McDonough

  In 2000, I replanted this hypatufa trough that I made 30 years ago.  Planting troughs
is always an experiment to find plants that won't grow too vigorously and swamp
their neighbors.  In this photo, taken mid May, 2002, you can catch a glimpse on
the left a the course growing form of Erigeron compositus with lavender daisies.
It was from NARGS seed and identified as E. compositus var. discoideus, 
although I don't believe it is that variety.  It'll be ripped out and discarded soon.
 
In the lower left is Antennaria straminea, a slow-growing dwarf pussytoe from
New Foundland.  The flowers aren't much to look at, and they get cut off before
they lengthen and release the seed "fluff".  But the foliage is nice and intensely
silver, and for an Antennaria, it's very slow growing.
  
On the right is the beautiful little Penstemon procerus var. formosus.  
It came mislabeled as Penstemon procerus v. pulchellus, but there is
 no such combination.  The misidentification has it's roots in England
 where the corrupted name P. pulchellus, or the misapplied name
P. campanulatus pulchellus (a tall red to purple flowered Mexican species)
was applied to this tiny alpine form of Penstemon procerus from Oregon, 
California and adjacent Nevada.. 


In the upper center is Talinum 'Zoe', an ideal trough inhabitant.  It's a
hybrid between Talinum okanoganense and T. spinescens, both of
which are found in Washington to British Columbia (the latter species
is also found in northeast Oregon).  In the photo above, the dark
reddish bead-like leaves conceal the numerous buds just starting
to develop.  Click the link above to see this plant in full flower.

Also growing in this trough is Lesquerella arizonica, Eriogonum douglasii,
Eriogonum caespitosum var. nivale, Draba sierrae, and Silene suksdorfii.

(Click on the links for portrait photos)

Photos by Mark McDonough
(taken May 2002)

 

 

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Questions or comments on this page?  Contact Mark McDonough at antennaria@aol.com.

Images and textual content copyright 2000 Mark McDonough

This page was last updated on 05/27/02